Archive for ‘Mother Earth’

18/06/2021

‘Drought Has Directly Affected 1.5 Billion People So Far this Century, More than Any Other Slow-Onset Disaster’

17 June 2021 (WMO)* — Drought has directly affected 1.5 billion people so far this century, more than any other slow-onset disaster.
This number will grow dramatically because of climate change, environmental degradation and demographic shifts.

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17/06/2021

‘It is shameful and tragic that EU countries can’t agree on something as fundamental as saving lives at sea’

Human Wrongs Watch

By Human Rights Watch*

EU: Protect Lives on Central Mediterranean Route: 20-Point Action Plan to Protect People at Sea and on the Move

Migrants and refugees on an overcrowded rubber boat during a rescue by the Spanish NGO Open Arms in the Mediterranean Sea, Feb. 12, 2021
Migrants and refugees on an overcrowded rubber boat during a rescue by the Spanish NGO Open Arms in the Mediterranean Sea, Feb. 12, 2021. © AP Photo/Bruno Thevenin

(Milan) – European Union governments have a collective responsibility to protect the lives and rights of people on the move along the central Mediterranean route, Human Rights Watch on 16 June 2021 said.

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17/06/2021

Q&A: ‘Why Do People Have to Die Before a Famine Is Declared?’

Human Wrongs Watch

By Ljubica Vujadinovic*

16 June 2021 (WFP)* — Famine — driven by conflict and fueled by climate shocks and the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic — could soon become a reality for millions of people. Below, the World Food Programme’s acting director of nutrition, Allison Oman Lawi, explains what famine is — and spells out the urgent need for action to avert it.
A child in Hajjah is diagnosed with moderate acute malnutrition. Photo: WFP/Issa Al-Ragh
Yemen: A child at a WFP-supported clinic in Hajjah is diagnosed with moderate acute malnutrition. Photo: WFP/Issa Al-Ragh

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17/06/2021

‘As Much As One Billion Hectares of Degraded Land Can Be Restored over the Next 10 Years… If There Is Political Will’

17 June 2021 (UNCCD)* — Climate change, overuse and conversion for agriculture, cities and infrastructure mean that one fifth of the planet’s land area is degraded. This damage, which also drives drought and desertification, harms the livelihoods of almost half the planet’s population.

However, as much as one billion hectares can be restored over the next 10 years if there is political will.

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17/06/2021

‘Humanity Is Waging a Relentless, Self-Destructive War on Nature’

Human Wrongs Watch

By António Guterres, UN Secretary General*

A line of African farmers smiling

Humanity is waging a relentless, self-destructive war on nature.

Biodiversity is declining, greenhouse gas concentrations are rising, and our pollution can be found from the remotest islands to the highest peaks.

We must make peace with nature.

The land can be our greatest ally. But the land is suffering.

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17/06/2021

Nearly Three Quarters of the Earth’s Ice-Free Land, Altered by Humans to Meet Ever-Growing Demand for Food, Raw Materials, Highways, Homes…

Human Wrongs Watch

People on a sand landscape tending to crops

In Faux-Cap, Madagascar, the dunes and their strong winds pose a threat to their crops. With the greenest weapons, its inhabitants worked for 120 days to secure 75 hectares of dunes. Once settled, the risk is over. PHOTO:UNDP Madagascar

16 June 2021 (United Nations)* — The 2021 Desertification and Drought Day to be held on 17 June will focus on turning degraded land into healthy land. Restoring degraded land brings economic resilience, creates jobs, raises incomes and increases food security.

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16/06/2021

11 Reasons Why Migrant Workers’ Remittances Are Important

Human Wrongs Watch

©IFAD/GMB Akash

15 June 2021 (IFAD)* — Every year, on 16 June, the International Day of Family Remittances (IDFR) is observed to raise further awareness on the abnegation and sacrifice of migrant workers, who support their families and communities of origin through the money they send back home, particularly in these times of crisis.

This year, the IDFR lauds the human spirit and resilience of over 200 million migrants who defied predictions of the pandemic and continued to send money home to their countries of origin.

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16/06/2021

Individual Migrant Workers’ Remittances May Be of ‘Relatively Small Value,’ But Collectively They Are Three Times Greater than Global Official Development Aid

People at both sides of an opened teller window

Over 200 million migrant workers sent US$554 billion back to their families in remittance-reliant countries in 2019. PHOTO:© IFAD

16 June 2021 (United Nations)* — The International Day of Family Remittances (IDFR) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly and is observed on 16 June. The IDFR recognizes more than 200 million migrant workers, women and men, who send money home to over 800 million family members.

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16/06/2021

Binding Action Urgently Required to Protect Millions of Children and Expectant Mothers’ Health from the Informal e-Waste Processing

Human Wrongs Watch

First World Health Organization report on e-waste and child health calls for more effective and binding action to protect children from growing health threat.

15 June 2021 (WHO)* —  Effective and binding action is urgently required to protect the millions of children, adolescents and expectant mothers worldwide whose health is jeopardized by the informal processing of discarded electrical or electronic devices according to a new ground-breaking report from the World Health Organization: Children and Digital Dumpsites.

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© WHO/Abraham Thiga Mwaura | An e-waste worker disassembles items in Ghana.
16/06/2021

5 Things to Know about the Circular Economy

(UN News)*Due to the ever-increasing demands of the global economy, the resources of the planet are being used up at an alarming rate and waste and pollution are growing fast. The idea of a more sustainable “circular economy” is gaining traction, but what does this concept mean, and can it help save the planet?
UNDP/Sumaya Agha | Women sort plastic at a recycling plant in Jordan.

1) Business as usual, the path to catastrophe

Unless we make some major adjustments to the way the planet is run, many observers believe that business as usual puts us on a path to catastrophe.

Around 90 per cent of global biodiversity loss and water stress (when the demand for water is greater than the available amount), and a significant proportion of the harmful emissions that are driving climate change, is caused by the way we use and process natural resources.

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