Archive for ‘Market Lords’

28/08/2014

UN Climate Summit 2014 — Change Is In The Air!

New York, 27 August 2014 — Climate change is not a far-off problem. It is happening now and is having very real consequences on people’s lives. Climate change is disrupting national economies, costing us dearly today and even more tomorrow. But there is a growing recognition that affordable, scalable solutions are available now that will enable us all to leapfrog to cleaner, more resilient economies, the UN reports
Carbon Emission | Photo: UN

Carbon Emission | Photo: UN

There is a sense that change is in the air. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has invited world leaders, from government, finance, business, and civil society to Climate Summit 2014 this 23 September to galvanize and catalyze climate action.

He has asked these leaders to bring bold announcements and actions to the Summit that will reduce emissions, strengthen climate resilience, and mobilize political will for a meaningful legal agreement in 2015. Climate Summit 2014 provides a unique opportunity for leaders to champion an ambitious vision, anchored in action that will enable a meaningful global agreement in 2015.

The Climate Summit is to be attended by more than 100 heads of state and government along with leaders from business, finance and civil society.

27/08/2014

Majority of Youth in Asia Are Either in Low Quality Jobs or Unemployed.

Human Wrongs Watch

A new International Labour Organization (ILO) report on the transitions of young people from education to the employment market in Asia and the Pacific, finds majority of youth in the region are either in low quality jobs or unemployed.

ILO/Jassim Salam 2014

ILO/Jassim Salam 2014

BANGKOK, 27 August 2014 (ILO)*  – Nearly half of workers aged 15−29 in Asia and the Pacific are self-employed and two in three youth are in paid work without a written contract, says a new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO).
.
According to the study, Labour market transitions of young women and men in Asia and the Pacific, informality and vulnerable employment are the reality for the vast majority of young workers in the region.
.
While unemployment remains an important concern for young people in the region, the low-quality of work is by far a bigger problem. Of those who do have jobs, very few have a written employment contract or access to core benefits like paid sick leave or social security coverage.
27/08/2014

Stop Violence Against the Girl Child

Human Wrongs Watch

The UN Secretary-General’s UNiTE to End Violence against Women campaign, managed by UN Women, has proclaimed every 25th of the month as “Orange Day” – a day to take action to raise awareness and prevent violence against women and girls.

Photo from UN Women

Photo from UN Women

Initiated and led by the UNiTE campaign Global Youth Network, Orange Day calls upon activists, governments and UN partners to mobilize people and highlight issues relevant to preventing and ending violence against women and girls, not only once a year, on 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women), but every month.

2014 Orange Day themes

25 August – Eliminating violence against the girl child
25 July – Addressing violence against women and girls in the informal economy
25 June – Engaging sport communities and addressing violence against women and girls in sport
25 May – Working with the corporate sector to end violence against women and girls
25 April – End conflict-related sexual violence against women and girls
25 March – End female genital mutilation
25 February – Ending violence against women and girls must be part of new development framework
25 January – Access to justice for survivors

Sign up for news and action alerts here! Follow @SayNO_UNiTE on Twitter. Like https://www.facebook.com/SayNO.UNiTE on Facebook.

27/08/2014

UN Health Agency Calls for Regulation of ‘e-cigarettes,’ Curbs on Advertising, Sales to Minors

Human Wrongs Watch

Electronic cigarettes, known as e-cigarettes, represent an “evolving frontier filled with promise and threat for tobacco control,” a new United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) report said on 26 August 2014, urging regulations to impede their promotion to non-smokers and young people.*

E-cigarette. Photo: WHO

E-cigarette. Photo: WHO

“Evidence shows that while they are likely to be less toxic than conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes use poses threats to adolescents and fetuses of pregnant mothers using these devices,” said Douglas Bettcher, WHO Director of Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases in an interview with UN Radio.

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), of which electronic cigarettes are the most common prototype, are devices that do not burn or use tobacco leaves but instead vaporise a solution the user then inhales. The report says existing evidence shows that e-cigarette aerosol is not merely “water vapour” as is often claimed in the marketing of these products.

27/08/2014

Year’s Deadliest Week: More than 300 Die in Boat Tragedies on Mediterranean

Human Wrongs Watch

26 August 2014 – The past few days have been the deadliest this year for people making irregular crossings on the Mediterranean from North Africa to Europe, with the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) reporting that at least 300 people have died in successive boat tragedies.

Photo: UNHCR/M. Sibiloni

Photo: UNHCR/M. Sibiloni

“In all, we now believe 1,889 people have perished this year while making such journeys, 1,600 of these since the start of June,” said Melissa Fleming, UNHCR spokesperson, telling reporters in Geneva on 26 August 2014 that over the past few days, at least three vessels having overturned or sunk.*

The first and largest of these incidents occurred on Friday when a boat reportedly carrying at least 270 people overturned near Garibouli to the east of Tripoli. Nineteen people, one of them a woman, survived.

“The Libyan coastguard has since recovered the bodies of 100 others, including five children under the age of five and seven women, but the remaining passengers are feared drowned,” said Fleming.

25/08/2014

Bangladesh: the Crippling Cost of Climate Change Adaptation

With 140 million inhabitants, Bangladesh is one of the world’s most populated countries. It is also one of the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Cyclones, floods and droughts have long been part of the country’s history but they have intensified in recent years. As a result of the long exposure to these hazards, Bangladesh is a world leader in adaptation strategies but this has come with a heavy price tag, according to the UN Environment Programme (UNEP)*
 
Chalan Beel Natore Bangladesh | Author:	Shahnoor Habib Munmun | Wikimedia Commons

Chalan Beel Natore Bangladesh | Author: Shahnoor Habib Munmun | Wikimedia Commons

To find out exactly how much tax payers’ money has been absorbed by efforts to tackle the effects of climate change, the Ministry of Finance has been working with the UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative to launch its first comprehensive climate change accounting system. The results of the financial review were telling.

23/08/2014

OP-ED: International Relations, the U.N. and Inter Press Service

Human Wrongs Watch

 **180 degree rotated map of the world| Released into the public domain by its author, Vardion.  | Wikimedia Commons

**180 degree rotated map of the world| Released into the public domain by its author, Vardion. | Wikimedia Commons

By Roberto Savio*

Roberto Savio

Roberto Savio

Rome, 24 August 2014 – In 1980, I had a debate at the United Nations with the late Stan Swinton, then the very powerful and brilliant director of Associated Press (AP). At one point, I furnished the following figures (which had been slow to change), as an example of Western bias in the media:

In 1964, four transnational news agencies – AP, United Press International (UPI), Agence France Presse (AFP) and Reuters – handled 92 percent of world information flow. The other agencies from industrialised countries, including the Soviet news agency TASS, handled a further 7 percent. That left the rest of the world with a mere 1 percent.

Why, I asked, was the entire world obliged to receive information from the likes of AP in which the United States was always the main actor? Swinton’s reply was brief and to the point: “Roberto, the U.S. media account for 99 percent of our revenues. Do you think they are more interested in our secretary of state, or in an African minister?”

23/08/2014

The Measure of “Man’s Inhumanity to Man” — Profits and Poverty: The Economics of Forced Labour

Human Wrongs Watch

I had not then learned the measure of “man’s inhumanity to man,” nor to what limitless extent of wickedness he will go for the love of gain.” Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave (1853).

Those words were written by Solomon Northup in “Twe lve Years a Slave” more than 150 years ago, but they ring as true today as they did then.*

Shackles used to bind slaves. UN Photo/Mark Garten

Shackles used to bind slaves. UN Photo/Mark Garten

“More than a century after being banned in the developed world, and decades after being outlawed in the newly emerging developing world, modern forms of slavery—forced labour, human trafficking, forced sexual exploitation—still exist, and unfortunately risk growing in extent and profitability in the world today.”

These statements are part of chapter “Conclusions” of the International Labour Organization (ILOReport Profits and Poverty: The Economics of Forced Labour. The Chapter is here reproduced.

23/08/2014

An International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition

Human Wrongs Watch

23 August 2014 — The night of 22 to 23 August 1791, in Santo Domingo (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic) saw the beginning of the uprising that would play a crucial role in the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade.

slaveroute43

Photo from UNESCO

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is intended to inscribe the tragedy of the slave trade in the memory of all peoples. In accordance with the goals of the intercultural project “The Slave Route“, it should offer an opportunity for collective consideration of the historic causes, the methods and the consequences of this tragedy, and for an analysis of the interactions to which it has given rise between Africa, Europe, the Americas and the Caribbean.*

23/08/2014

South Sudan: The Extra Mile

Human Wrongs Watch

By Mike Pflanz*, (UNICEF) — Nyakuoch Keat’s nine-month-old son Bhan had been running a fever for days and was listless and unresponsive to his mother’s attempts to cheer him up. His condition worsened, to the point where he was not holding down any food and even seemed to lose consciousness at times.

Dr Thomas Lyimo talked with Nyakuoch Keat, who had carried her nine-month-old son Bhan Ruei to see him at an abandoned health centre on August 17 2014 in Kiech Kuon in Upper Nile State in South Sudan. Dr Lyimo was there as part of a UNICEF Rapid Response Mechanism mission, and found Bhan had a high fever that he suspected was severe malaria. He could only offer limited support due to the health centre’s lack of supplies.

Photo from UNICEF

There appeared to be very few options for Bhan and Nyakuoch, who live in South Sudan in a cluster of mud-and-thatch huts far removed from health services even when there is no war, which there is now. The nearest doctor was in the village of Kiech Kuon, a two hour walk away across flooded fields and swamps.

But since fighting broke out in December 2013, the clinic there has been closed, with staff fleeing the conflict and government supplies of medicines, equipment and salaries drying up.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 131 other followers

%d bloggers like this: