Archive for May 29th, 2015

29/05/2015

What Next for EU Migration Plans?

28 May 2015 (IRIN) – The European Commission has fleshed out its plans to manage record levels of irregular migration to the European Union’s shores, but there are still question marks around how, when and to what degree the proposals will be implemented.

**Photo: Åsa Sjöström/IRIN | Migrants disembark at the Sicilian port of Catania after being rescued from a shipwreck by a merchant vessel on 5 May

**Photo: Åsa Sjöström/IRIN | Migrants disembark at the Sicilian port of Catania after being rescued from a shipwreck by a merchant vessel on 5 May

Here’s an overview of the key issues and potential stumbling blocks:

Resettlement scheme

The European Agenda on Migration released two weeks ago included an EU-wide scheme to resettle 20,000 refugees over two years in addition to the 5,000 to 6,000 per year that about 12 member states currently take in.

It was initially unclear whether the scheme would be voluntary or mandatory but details released on Wednesday clarified that member states’ participation in the scheme would be “on a voluntary basis”.

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29/05/2015

Denial of (Muslim) Rohingya Rights Lead to Trafficking and Dangerous Sea Voyages

Bangkok, 27 May 2015 (Human Rights Watch)* – Rohingya and other survivors of dangerous boat voyages from Burma and Bangladesh describe horrific treatment by unscrupulous smugglers and traffickers in Burma, and abuse and neglect aboard ships, Human Rights Watch on 15 May said. A regional meeting scheduled on May 29, 2015, in Bangkok must find solutions to the so-called boat people exodus.

A boat survivor rescued by fishermen in East Aceh, Indonesia. Photo: UNHCR/F. Ijazah

A boat survivor rescued by fishermen in East Aceh, Indonesia. Photo: UNHCR/F. Ijazah

Boats carrying approximately 100 mostly Rohingya men and women each abandoned passengers at an undisclosed location along Thailand’s coast, leaving them to fend for themselves until they were found by the Thai authorities. According to international agencies, 3,000 to 4,000 people may still be aboard ships at sea.

“Survivors describe how they flee persecution in Burma only to fall into the hands of traffickers and extortionists, in many cases witnessing deaths and suffering abuse and hunger,” said Brad Adams, Asia director.

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