Archive for November 21st, 2014

21/11/2014

End Violence against Women

By UN Women*, November 2014 — To raise awareness and trigger action to end the global scourge of violence against women and girls, the UN observes International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 25 November. The 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence which follow (ending on 10 December, Human Rights Day) are a chance to mobilize and raise awareness.

Source: UN Women

This year, the UN Secretary-General’s UNiTE to End Violence against Women campaign invites you to “Orange YOUR Neighbourhood,” with the colour designated by the UNiTE campaign to symbolize a brighter future without violence. Organize events to orange your local streets, shops and schools!

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21/11/2014

Tell Your Bank Not to Invest in Nuclear Weapons!

Human Wrongs Watch 

The 2014 Don’t Bank on the Bomb report was launched earlier this month. The International Campaign against Nuclear Weapons (ICAN)* spoke with co-author of the report, Susi Snyder from PAX, about the impact of the report, and how you can take action to stop nuclear weapons financing. Act now and tell your bank not to invest in nuclear weapons.

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Source: ICAN

There is increased awareness among the public about the way financial institutions behave, and how they invest their money. How do you see this report contributing to increasing understanding about nuclear weapon investments? 

Susi Snyder: The great thing about the Don’t Bank on the Bomb report is that it gives every person with a bank account (and that’s most of us!) an easy way to do something about nuclear weapons.

You don’t need to have a background in physics or international relations or high finance to say loud and clear “these weapons are unacceptable, and I don’t want to pay for them!”  This report is unique in the world because there is no other single place to find all of this information.

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21/11/2014

Children Born in Exile — The Challenge of Life in Their Afghan Homeland

Human Wrongs Watch

By Maya Ameratunga, Kabul, Afghanistan, 20 November 2014 (UNHCR)* – The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted 25 years ago today to protect children like Hasanat, Aisha and Safia.

© UNHCR/B.Baloch | Young Afghan refugees on their way home to Afghanistan wave goodbye to Pakistan.

© UNHCR/B.Baloch | Young Afghan refugees on their way home to Afghanistan wave goodbye to Pakistan.

The three, aged between seven and 13, have all returned to a homeland, Afghanistan, that they had heard much about but never visited. Half of Afghanistan’s 5 million returnees since 2002 were born in exile, mostly in Iran or Pakistan, which together still shelter 2.5 million Afghans.

Hasanat, Aisha and Safia all face further challenges in a country that remains volatile and poverty stricken, and their stories reflect the vulnerability of childhood in the region as well as the resilience of young returnees. Hasanat tells a harrowing tale of return; the stories of Aisha and Safia highlight some of the human rights problems children face.

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21/11/2014

“Children are the fundamental building block for achieving the future we want"

Human Wrongs Watch

New York, 20 November 2014 – As countries around the world celebrate the 25th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the United Nations family today hailed the landmark treaty as a powerful human rights tool, while taking stock of the long-standing disparities that must be addressed to propel actions for the well-being of all children into the future.

A child with his mother. Photo: UNICEF/Naser Siddique

A child with his mother. Photo: UNICEF/Naser Siddique

Opening a high-level meeting this morning at UN Headquarters in New York, the President of the General Assembly, Sam Kutesa, underscored that the Convention is a collective commitment to ensure that every child worldwide has the right to a fair start in life, calling on Member States to safeguard that such rights are fully reflected in the post-2015 development agenda.*

“We must continue investing in the rights of all children across the world – no matter their gender, ethnicity, race, disability or economic status,” Kutesa said.

“Children are the fundamental building block for achieving the future we want. Indeed, by strengthening their capacity to mature into engaged, responsible and productive adults, society as a whole stands to benefit,” he added.

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