Archive for May 20th, 2019

20/05/2019

Celebrating the Greatest of All Pollinators—Bees

20 May 2019 (UN Environment)*  — When animals and insects pick up the pollen of flowers and spread it, they allow plants, including many food crops, to reproduce. Birds, rodents, monkeys and even people pollinate, but the most common pollinators are insects, and among them, bees.

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Megachile rotundata, or « Leaf-cutting bee ».| Jodelet / Lépinay | Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 France license.

Pollinators contribute directly to food security. Nearly three quarters of the plants that produce 90 per cent of the world’s food require this external help.

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20/05/2019

Creating a Buzz

Human Wrongs Watch

To celebrate World Bee Day, here are six reasons why we should all ‘bee’ grateful for bees.

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75 percent of the world’s food crops, like apples, coffee and blueberries, owe their existence to pollinators. Left: ©FAO/ Richard Slaby

20 May 2019 (FAO)* — “It’s a bee!” someone screams as they jump up from their picnic blanket, knocking over their apple juice and flailing their arms, trying to get away from this flying creature. Does this scene sound familiar?

Many people are afraid of bees. And why not? They look like aliens. They have stingers that hurt more than you would expect and some people are very allergic, even deathly allergic, to them.

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20/05/2019

Bees Mean Life

Human Wrongs Watch

Why we need bees for a nutritious future

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Three out of four crops across the globe producing fruits or seeds for human use as food depend, at least in part, on bees and other pollinators. ©FAO/Greg Beals

19 May 2019 (FAO)* — It’s early May in one of Spain’s most prolific honey-producing region, and Julio Solana Muñoz is worried. The third-generation beekeeper has noticed that the flowers in the fields near his town aren’t anywhere near as numerous as they were even a year ago. His hives are dying off, too. In recent years, the mortality rate for his bees has climbed to nearly 35 percent.

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