Archive for January 28th, 2020

28/01/2020

Biodiversity in Grave Danger: What Can Be Done in 2020?

28 January 2020 (UN Environment)* — Taking action to stem biodiversity loss was the focus of several events, reports and activities in January—important reminders that 2020, the “Super Year” for nature, is a real opportunity to stop and indeed reverse ecological devastation.

agroecolgy_2_Photo_by_Flickr

Photo by Flickr
28/01/2020

Humans Love Violence: Gandhi and the World Economic Forum

Human Wrongs Watch

By Robert J. Burrowes*

DAYLESFORD, Australia, 28 January 2020As we approach the 72nd anniversary of the assassination of Mohandas K. Gandhi on 30 January 1948, it is worth reflecting on one simple fact that he did not realize.

robert-j-burrowes111

Robert J. Burrowes,

His efforts to teach humanity that conflict, including violent conflict, could be resolved without violence were based on one fundamentally flawed assumption: that at least some humans were interested in, and committed to, seeking out and using nonviolent strategies for dealing with conflict in each and every context.

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28/01/2020

Nearly 5 Million Children in Need Due to Rising Violence in Central Sahel: UNICEF

Human Wrongs Watch

27 January 2020 (UN News)*A surge in violence in the central Sahel region in Africa means nearly five million children will need humanitarian assistance this year, up from 4.3 million, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned on Tuesday.

UN OCHA/Giles Clarke | Boys play in a waterhole near the town of Kaya in northern Burkina Faso.

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28/01/2020

5 Shocking Facts about Extreme Global Inequality and How to Even It Up

Human Wrongs Watch

OXFAM International* — Extreme inequality is out of control. Hundreds of millions of people are living in extreme poverty while huge rewards go to those at the very top. There are more billionaires than ever before, and their fortunes have grown to record levels. Meanwhile, the world’s poorest got even poorer.

Hundreds of millions of people are living in extreme poverty while huge rewards go to those at the very top.

The growing gap between rich and poor is undermining the fight against poverty, damaging our economies and tearing our societies apart. Yet inequality is not inevitable – it is a political choice. Photo: Eleanor Farmer/Oxfam

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