16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence


Human Wrongs Watch

24 November 2020 (UN Women)* — The UN Secretary-General’s UNiTE by 2030 to End Violence against Women campaign is marking the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-based Violence (25 November to 10 December 2020) under the global theme, Orange the World: Fund, Respond, Prevent, Collect!.

Orange the world: Fund, respond, prevent, collect

UN Women’s Generation Equality campaign is amplifying the call for global action to bridge funding gaps, ensure essential services for survivors of violence during the COVID-19 crisis, focus on prevention, and collection of data that can improve life-saving services for women and girls.

The campaign is part of UN Women’s efforts for Beijing+25 and building up to launch bold new actions and commitments to end violence against women at the Generation Equality Forum in Mexico and France in 2021.

This year is like no other. Even before COVID-19 hit, violence against women and girls had reached pandemic proportions. Globally, 243 million women and girls were abused by an intimate partner in the past year. Meanwhile, less than 40 per cent of women who experience violence report it or seek help.

As countries implemented lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus, violence against women, especially domestic violence, intensified – in some countries, calls to helplines have increased five-fold.

In others, formal reports of domestic violence have decreased as survivors find it harder to seek help and access support through the regular channels.

School closures and economic strains left women and girls poorer, out of school and out of jobs, and more vulnerable to exploitation, abuse, forced marriage, and harassment.

In April 2020, as the pandemic spread across the world, the UN Secretary-General called for “peace at home”, and 146 Member States responded with their strong statement of commitment. In recent months 135 countries have strengthened actions and resources to address violence against women as part of the response to COVID-19. Yet, much more is needed.

Today, although the voices of activists and survivors have reached a crescendo that cannot be silenced or ignored, ending violence against women will require more investment, leadership and action. It cannot be sidelined; it must be part of every country’s national response, especially during the unfolding COVID-19 crisis.

For the 16 Days of Activism, UN Women handed over the mic to survivors, activists and UN partners on the ground, to tell the story of what happened after COVID-19 hit. Read and share stories, get inspired by activists who are making a difference every single day, and find out how you can take action.

Top stories | News | Photos | Campaign | Take action | Facts and figures |

*SOURCE: UN Women. Go to ORIGINAL.

READ ALSO:

Top stories

What happened after COVID-19

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, 243 million women and girls globally were abused by their intimate partners in the past year. Since the pandemic, with lockdowns measures, countries around the world have seen an alarming rise in reporting on violence against women, especially domestic violence. “What Happened after COVID-19 hit” brings you stories from women on the front lines and the solutions to back.

Yobanca Fernandez Flores. Photo: UN Women/Débora Fernandez

Bolivia: “Many women faced violence; some did not survive”

Alepher Matemba Banda. Photo courtesy of Alepher Matemba Banda

Malawi: Learning to identify abuse and assist survivors during COVID-19

Meserat Hailu. Photo courtesy of Meserat Hailu

Lebanon: A groundbreaking case for Lebanon’s migrant domestic workers

A survivor of domestic violence talking to Gentjana Zeneli, lawyer working for Human Rights in Democracy Center. Photo: UN Women/Ed Pagria

Albania: How six local women’s organizations ensured access to justice for survivors

Naiyapak Chaipan works for the 1300 Hotline, managed by the Thai government’s Social Assistance Centre that assists women seeking to leave abusive and violent situations.  Photo: UN Women/Younghwa Choi

Thailand: For front-line workers answering the hotline, the case load doubled

Dhana in her home.

Nepal: “I put my savings into the land purchase. I want my rightful share.”

2020 Human Wrongs Watch

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